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Charity MCF News

Community Action: Exeter Deaf Academy.

Exeter Royal Academy for Deaf Education has been located in the City for over 190 years. It is a bi-lingual day and residential school which welcomes deaf children and young people, aged between 5 and 25 from across the UK.

Its aim is to give students the confidence, communication skills, education, and support network they need to achieve their goals.

The success of the academy has meant that it’s current facilities no longer meet the needs of its Students and Staff. It has therefore been decided to move to a new purpose built Campus in Exmouth. The new buildings will include a range of up to date facilities to cater for a diverse range of needs including autism, epilepsy, physical and multi-sensory disabilities.

It is hoped that construction of the new buildings will be completed later this year.

The work of the Academy first came to the attention of Devonshire Freemasons when their Leader, Provincial Grand Master Ian Kingsbury, heard a presentation at The House of Lords by Steve Morton, Director of Development for the academy.

Inspired by what he had heard, Ian returned to Devonshire determined to help those affected by this very
difficult sensory disability.

To this end, he approached the Devonshire Freemasons Benevolent Fund Committee who agreed an immediate donation of £5,000.

MCF Logo
Masonic Charitable Foundation

Following this initial donation in October 2018, an approach was made to the Freemasons’ central charity the Masonic Charitable Foundation (MCF) who have agreed further funding of £28,380 to equip a Multi-Sensory Immersive Space within the new centre in Exmouth, bringing the total donated to £33,380.

Recently Devonshire Freemasons’ Chief Fundraiser, Reuben Ayres, accompanied by Clive Eden, visited the Academy. Here they met up again with Steve Morton and Appeals Manager Sarah Shaw and presented them with a certificate confirming the £28,380 which is going to support the wonderful work undertaken by the Academy.

When presenting the certificate, Reuben Ayres said:

‘Young people all need us to be there to help them grow for the future, none more so than those with a lack of hearing who are denied the normal things that we take so much for granted in the world we live in.’

Reuben Ayres, Provincial Charity Steward, Province of Devonshire

Explaining how the donation would assist in the Academy’s work, Steve Morton said:

‘We are extremely grateful for the ongoing support from the Provincial Grand Lodge of Devonshire and now the Masonic Charitable Foundation. Without the support of generous organisations like these we wouldn’t be able to change the lives of some of the most vulnerable Deaf young people in UK.

Our work helps young people, who have often been isolated in the past, to access education and opportunities for development which ultimately will enable them to have more independent lives.

The immersive room is there to help those facing the greatest challenges to benefit from our work and Ian, Reuben and their fellow Freemasons have played a large part in making that a reality.’

Steve Morton, Director of Development.

To find out more about the exiting new development at Exeter Royal Academy for Deaf Education

Click Here

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About History

Freemasonry through the Ages.

When, where, how, why Freemasonry originated are questions which are still the subject of intense speculation. The consensus amongst most Masonic scholars is that it descends directly or indirectly from the organisation of operative stonemasons who built the great cathedrals and castles of the middle ages.

Here we bring you a brief round up of the most important historic milestones.

July 31, 1599

The Oldest Masonic Lodge Minutes in existence are from the Lodge of Edinburgh No. 1 which has records to prove its continual existence as the world’s oldest Masonic Lodge.

1646

Elias Ashmole (The founder of the Ashmolean Museum at the University of Oxford) recorded his initiation into Freemasonry with these words…

“October 16, 4.30pm – I was made a freemason at Warrington in Lancashire with Colonel Henry Mainwaring (a Roundhead parliamentarian friend related to his father-in-law) of Karincham in Cheshire. The names of those that were then at the Lodge, Mr Richard Penket Worden, Mr James Collier, Mr Richard Sankey, Henry Littler, John Ellam, Richard Ellam and Hugh Brewer.”

Diary of Elias Ashmole

This is the first evidence of the initiation of an English speculative mason – notwithstanding the fact that those present and listed would have certainly been initiated at an earlier date.

24 June 1717

Four London Lodges, which had existed for some time, came together at the Goose and Gridiron Tavern in St Paul’s Churchyard in London, declared themselves a Grand Lodge and elected Anthony Sayer as their Grand Master. This was
the first Grand Lodge in the world.

1723

By this time the new Grand Lodge had published its first rule book – The Book of Constitutions of Masonry – and was meeting quarterly and recording its meetings. It had extended its authority outside London.

1725

The Grand Lodge of Ireland was established.

1736

The Grand Lodge of Scotland was established. The three Home Grand Lodges began to take Freemasonry overseas and the development of Freemasonry abroad mirrors the 18th and 19th century development of the British Empire.

1751

A rival Grand Lodge appeared in London. Its original members were Irish Masons who claimed that the original Grand Lodge had made innovations. They dubbed the first Grand Lodge the Moderns and called themselves the Antients. The two existed side by side – both at home and abroad – for nearly 63 years, neither recognising each other as regular.

1813

After four years of negotiation, the two Grand Lodges in England united on 27 December 1813 to form the
United Grand Lodge of England.
This union led to a great deal of standardisation of ritual, procedures and regalia.

1814

Some 647 Lodges were in existence. The 19th century saw a great expansion of Freemasonry – both at home and abroad.

1900

2,800 Lodges had been established despite losses when independent Grand Lodges were formed in Canada and Australia in the later part of the century.

1933

Freemasons Hall in Great Queen Street in London was opened as The Masonic Peace Memorial

1914 -1945

The two World Wars both had a great effect on English Freemasonry.

In the three years after the First World War over 350 new Lodges were set up, and in the three years after the Second World War nearly 600 new Lodges came into being.

In many cases the founders were servicemen who wanted to continue the camaraderie they had built up during their war service, and were looking for a calm centre in a
greatly changed and changing world.

1967

On 14 June 1967 the 250th anniversary of Grand Lodge was celebrated at the Royal Albert Hall. Centrepiece of the celebrations was the installation as Grand Master of
HRH The Duke of Kent,
who still holds that office today.

1992

On 10 June 1992 over 12,500 Freemasons and guests gathered at Earls Court in West London to celebrate the 275th anniversary of Grand Lodge.

For the first time press and television were present at a meeting of Grand Lodge and the event featured on television newscasts around the world.

2017

Freemasons from around the world celebrated the 300th Anniversary of the United Grand Lodge of England..

Some famous Freemasons…

  • At least five Kings of England (more recently Edward VII, Edward VIII and George VI)
  • The present Duke of Kent
  • Statesmen Winston Churchill and Lord Kitchener
  • Military genius the Duke of Wellington
  • Authors Rudyard Kipling and Arthur Conan Doyle
  • World Cup winning England manager, Sir Alf Ramsey
  • The explorer Ernest Shackleton
  • The scientist who discovered penicillin, Alexander Fleming
  • Painter William Hogarth
  • 18th Century Poet Alexander Pope
  • Flamboyant playwright Oscar Wilde
  • Famous actors David Garrick, Richard Todd and Peter Sellers
  • Musicians: Arthur Sullivan of Gilbert and Sullivan fame and Nat King Cole
Categories
News

Barnstaple Charity wins Freemasons’ support

On Saturday 22nd February almost 70 South Molton Freemasons, their wives, partners and friends, braved the winter storms to attend the Loyal Lodge of Industry’s 2020 Ladies Night.

Held in the bright, clean, modern surroundings of Bishops Nympton Parish Hall, the event featured a sumptuous three course dinner, toasts and speeches, and music provided by
South Molton’s very own Jason Toft.

Ladies Festival 2020

South Molton’s Freemasons are well known for their support of local Charities. The recipient of the proceeds from this year’s event will be Barnstaple based… ChemoHero.

chemohero.org

ChemoHero works to support patients at North Devon Hospital’s Seamoor Unit by providing them with “Boxes of Kindness” as they begin courses of treatment for a wide range of Cancers. The boxes contain various items especially chosen to help them cope with the rigours of Chemotherapy

chemohero.org
A box of Kindness

Over 40 different items go into a “Box of Kindness”, some are donated and others sponsored; but most have been fundraised for by people of the North Devon.

Since ChemoHero was founded, more than 1000 boxes have been provided to Cancer Patients in North Devon.

In 2019, Founder Lisa Wallis BEM was
awarded the Pride of Britain West Country
fundraiser of the year award.

Explaining why he and his wife had chosen this
particular Charity, the Lodge’s Worshipful Master,
John Finch said…

“We are delighted to be able to support the amazing work of ChemoHero. Their boxes of kindness make a real difference to people, at what can be a difficult time in their lives. Together with the hard working and dedicated staff at The North Devon Hospital they are supporting families right across our Community.”

John Finch, Worshipful Master. Loyal Lodge of Industry No 421

Commenting on how donations like this help their work, Rob Wallis, Co-Founder of the Charity said…

“At ChemoHero we cannot thank groups like the Freemasons enough for their kind contributions towards the work we do. These donations go back into creating our bespoke boxes of kindness that contain many useful and luxury items for North Devon Chemotherapy patients.”

Rob Wallis. ChemoHero Co-Founder
If you would like to donate or fundraise in support of the wonderful work that ChemoHero do…

Image Credits: ChemoHero, @xeramax

Categories
News

Guiding Principles

UGLE Logo
The United Grand Lodge of England (UGLE) is the governing body for Freemasonry
in England and Wales.

We are delighted to be able to bring you the new Brochure produced by UGLE which explains in greater detail, the four guiding principles by which Freemasons try to
define their path through life.

If having read it, you’re thinking that our principles may be similar to your own, then you might want to consider
becoming a member.

If you want to know more about Freemasonry in general or the
Loyal Lodge of Industry No 421
in particular, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

We’d love to hear from you!

Categories
News

A brief history of masonic Jewels

At our regular February meeting, we were delighted to welcome a very special Guest.

ProvGSec
W.Bro. Dr Richard Ebrey – Provincial Grand Secretary.

W.Bro. Dr. Richard Ebrey, the Provincial Grand Secretary for the Masonic Province of Devonshire was our guest speaker, and his subject was..

A brief history of
Masonic Jewels

Masonic “Jewels” are not, as you might expect, Precious Stones like Diamonds and Rubies. They are in fact the small “Medals” or insignia worn by Freemasons as part of their Regalia to…

  • Denote a particular office or rank
  • Show support for a particular Charity of Appeal
  • Demonstrate membership of Royal Arch Masonry
  • Mark a special Event or Anniversary such as the recent Tercentenary of the founding of the United Grand Lodge of England.
  • Show that they are either a Founder or a Past Master of a Particular Lodge.
  • Mark achievements such as a Lodge Centenary
A Past Master’s Collar Jewel

Worn either on the breast of a jacket or appended to a collar. Masonic Jewels add a colourful and intriguing aspect to Masonic history as they have been around since at least 1727 when Masters and Wardens of Lodges were instructed by the United Grand Lodge of England to…

“Wear the Jewels of Masonry hanging on a white ribbon”

A selection of Masonic Breast Jewels

Designs have varied widely over the years with some spectacular examples featuring precious metals and real jewels. The standard of Craftsmanship displayed by silversmiths and jewellers was often exemplary which is reflected in modern resale values.

One particularly poignant part of Dr. Ebrey’s talk concerned Masonic Jewels produced by prisoners of War from Napoleonic times until the Second World War when allied POW’s in Changi risked the wrath of their captors by producing jewels and insignia to be used at undercover meetings held in the camp.

Royal Arch Collar Jewel
Ancient & Accepted Rite Collar Jewel
UGLE Collar Jewel

At the conclusion of the talk our Worshipful Master W.Bro. John Finch thanked W.Bro. Ebrey for an interesting and enjoyable insight into this fascinating aspect of Masonic History.

All our members will be keeping their eyes peeled on their next visit to one of South Molton Pannier Market’s Antiques Events.

Following the formal part of the evening everyone repaired to the dining room for an excellent and convivial dinner.