Categories
Charity News

A Big Thank You!

Our Lodge meetings may be temporarily suspended, but our Charitable work goes on regardless.

Just this week we received a lovely letter of thanks from
the Calvert Trust, based in nearby Exmoor.

Calvert Trust Exmoor is a five-star accredited activity centre, located in an area of outstanding natural beauty on the edge of Exmoor National Park. Their award-winning centre enables people with physical, learning, behavioural and sensory disabilities to experience exciting, challenging and enjoyable outdoor activities,
together with their friends and families.
They welcome guests of all ages and levels of ability.

Their letter detailed some of the pressing problems they have encountered as a result of the Covid-19 Pandemic

“… we are extremely grateful for your support now more than ever to help us through this incredibly challenging period”.


“Calvert Trust Exmoor… now faces the greatest challenge to its existence through the impact of Coronavirus”.

Calvert Trust

However the Team are working hard to ensure that as soon as the current restrictions are lifted they can return to their vital and essential work

…the Trustees and key members of our staff team are working hard to ensure the continued viability of Calvert Trust Exmoor.

We are enormously proud of… the incredibly positive impact Calvert Trust Exmoor has had on the lives of so many. It is with the help of people like you that we are determined that come what may, Calvert Trust Exmoor will continue to enrich people’s lives long into the future.

Calvert Trust

Peter Kyle, our Charity Steward said…

We are delighted to support the wonderful work of the Calvert Trust and hope that our donation will go some way to ensuring a swift resumption of their day to day activities which have a positive impact on so many lives”.

Peter Kyle – Loyal Lodge of Industry No 421

To read the letter in full Click Here

For more information on the work of the Calvert Trust you can visit their website at https://calvertexmoor.org.uk/home/

Categories
About MCF News

A message from the PGM

PROVINCIAL GRAND LODGE
OF DEVONSHIRE

22 April 2020


Brethren all,


We are now over thirty days into lockdown and complying with the sensible guidance from Government and United Grand Lodge of England. We know this will save lives and together we can defeat this terrible virus.

My Executive and I want you to know we are so proud of you and your families for your compliance and patience in following these new and temporary rules.

But I want to go further, and praise you all for the ways I learn you have been helping others in the community. I have had so many examples of the good works that are currently being undertaken by our members.

Above all to those of you who are in the front line, risking your lives to care for others, we salute you and thank you for making us all proud to have you as Brothers. We thank you and your families for quietly putting into action the principles by which we live and I thank you from the bottom of my heart.

At the beginning of the confinement to our homes, I suggested that lodges ensure every member has the contact list of other Brethren and that in conjunction with the Almoners – all members are contacted personally. This identifies those who need help and also encourages us to chat and keep in touch. I hear this has been much appreciated and I hope it becomes a regular activity as the lockdown weeks go by and before we can meet again.

I know many of you are communicating electronically and I too have been holding meetings on Zoom, which does enable me to see which of my Executive are getting tea in bed!

As your Provincial Grand Master I love to hear of the many acts of kindness which are constantly being undertaken. Here are just two examples:

  • Over the Easter weekend Benevolent Lodge 303, Teignmouth, allowed a non-Mason and his son to cook Sunday roast dinners in their kitchen at for nearly 150 people and which were delivered free into the community. Well done Benevolent.
  • WBro. Mark Bowes-Cavanagh of Courtland Lodge 6706, donated 7000 hand sanitizers from his company to NHS care homes, schools and surgeries. Thank you Mark.

It does not go unnoticed that many more of you are working so hard to serve your community and I know it will continue – thankyou.

The UGLE Covid19 Response Group shares all our initiatives via our PGM’s Regional groups and in conjunction with the MCF, it is fully supportive of all we are doing. Meetings are held on a frequent basis via WhatsApp and they are keen to share ideas to enable best practice throughout our order.

The support and advice and sensible guidance we have received from UGLE since the beginning of this situation cannot be praised enough, we must all be grateful.

I expect most of you are aware of the Covid 19 Relief Chest that has been opened, by the MCF, and is ready to receive donations. I want to make it clear that if you choose to donate to this fund your contribution will be counted towards the total of the 2023 Devonshire Festival. Your contributions to this Covid19 relief chest will also count towards a Steward’s Festival Jewel.

I know we are all sorely disappointed that we were not able to hold our annual Provincial Grand Lodge Meeting at Torquay. Those newly appointed and promoted officers will be entitled to wear the collar for that office from the 20 April 2020. It upsets me, as much as you, at not being able to make that presentation on the stage. I am truly sorry Brethren and I congratulate all those promoted for what you have done so far in Masonry to deserve this recognition. Well done!

Let’s just hope that after we get through this dreadful situation we may be able to enjoy the rest of this year together.

I would also take this opportunity to thank my two Provincial Wardens: WBro. Rob Summers and WBro. Antony Eldred for their dedication and support. This of course came with heading up another year of dedicated active Provincial Officers.

I thank them for the incredible amount of £2,202 raised for our MCF Festival.

Those of you that are alone in your homes be reassured that you are part of a very caring organization that will help you through these difficult times. VWBro. Simon Rowe, WBro. Peter
Balsom and I are united in our endeavours to help you if we can.

Indeed we appeal to you all to join with us and the other leaders of the Provinces of Cornwall and Somerset for the 9 o’clock toast each day.

This dreaded virus has brought normal life to a standstill but given us a period of time to spend in quiet reflection on life. All the material things that we may crave for pale into insignificance and makes you realise it is the love and care we show for each other that is the most important.

You are all very precious and special people please keep safe and well.


Ian


RWBro Ian Kingsbury JP
Provincial Grand Master of Devonshire

Categories
News

Coronavirus Update

In accordance with advice from H.M. Government, The United Grand Lodge of England (UGLE) have suspended all masonic activity throughout England and Wales for an initial period of 4 months.

UGLE Logo

Having originally advised members over the age of 65 to refrain from attending meetings, the rapid pace of events and increasing need to prevent cross infection, has today led UGLE officially to close ALL Lodges and Chapters
throughout it’s jurisdiction.

The following statement was sent to all members today.

On 19/02/20 UGLE and the MCF issued this statement

An official communication from the
Pro Grand Master
Thursday 19 March 2020


Dear Brethren and Companions,

These are difficult and testing times for us all. First, I wanted to thank each and every one of you for your patience and understanding during this challenging and worrying period.
Coronavirus is going to be with us for some considerable time, and I am certain you are as disappointed as I am that we have, reluctantly, suspended all Masonic activity. I trust that you will agree that it was the right course of action at the right time.

I appreciate the enormous disruption that this will cause all of us, and also the hole left in our lives by the withdrawal of something we hold enormously dear.

To those of you who have been Masons for but a few months, this may seem a little strange, but to those like me, who have been ‘bitten by the bug’, we cannot help but feel bewilderment and sadness at how quickly something so important has been taken away from us, albeit temporarily.

For the next few months we may not see as much of each other as we have recently; we may be spread throughout the country, or indeed the world and we may have things asked of us which sit outside the ordinary compass of our experience.

From a personal point of view, being over 70 and diabetic I am
taking the “lock down” seriously, as I am sure all brethren in the same situation will. There are, of course, a great many in this position and it is not easy with no, even vague, end date in sight.

My real sympathies are with those who live alone. I am lucky, I have a wife, as well as our children all of whom are most
supportive and our daughter is arranging our shopping needs, where they can’t be delivered. I do hope that many of our brethren are in the same boat and over and above that, we all have our large and active masonic community to rely on.
We are luckier than most.

My youngest son is adamant that the best way forward is to try to have some form of structure in our day, as that is what we have been used to most of our lives, albeit in a very different format. I suspect that, in the current times, the structure will take on a rather strange appearance.

We live in a reasonably isolated area and can walk for over an hour without seeing anyone, therefore I think the dog is going to get a great deal fitter (and could even become a better ritualist!); my office might become and stay tidy, and I can catch up with all those things I have been putting off for far too long.

This won’t take up 3 months or whatever time is required, but I am sure other activities will develop as time goes by. Anything to keep mind and body active. Of course, at some point in the future, life will return again to normal. I have already mentioned trying to keep a structure in our lives. Freemasonry is
a very well-structured institution. Currently that structure has been disturbed, but rest assured that, whilst The Book of Constitutions is pretty rigid on some subjects, ways will be found to ensure that we get Lodges and Chapters back onto the right format as quickly as possible after the resumption.

This difficult period will run its course, and move into history and our Lodges and Chapters will begin to meet again. Candidates will experience the wonder of the initiation ceremony, Bro Treasurers will again chase their profligate Brethren for dues, Grand Officers will, more’s the pity, sit ‘tutting’ on the back rows over some ceremonial sleight, imagined or actual, and the rhythm of our masonic
lives will once again return to normal.

Over the last few years we have been trying to stress that Freemasonry mustmremain relevant to society and I have never been in doubt that this has been the case in many ways. However, it has never been more relevant than it is right now. What we do in the next few months, will be written into our Lodge and
Chapter histories and will test us, as an organisation and as people perhaps more than anything in our lifetimes. I think it is fair to say that I cannot remember a more testing time for the organisation, for society and for the country. We need to step up and do our part, as we have in difficult times past, to help those, our less fortunate Brethren, their families and the communities
from which we are drawn.

That is why, we have, today, released a joint statement with the MCF, the Freemasons’ Charity, committing to help those in need. Up and down the country, in Provinces large and small, Freemasons are coming together to commit to help those who find themselves at life’s lowest ebb. I encourage those of you who feel able to safely commit both time and effort to think on how you might play a very small part in this worthy National effort.

There are many great ideas already out there, and we will be sharing these and how successful they are as things develop.
We will need your dedication, flexibility and patience over the coming weeks and months to help each other through these turbulent times. Freemasonry has weathered many storms in its centuries-long history. It will weather this one too, and we will emerge ready for the challenges of, I suspect, a very different
world.

Look after yourselves, brethren, and I trust we can get back to normality in the not too distant future. I wish you and your families good health and happiness, and more than your fair share of luck.


Peter Lowndes
Pro Grand Master

A message from the Grand Secretary Friday 20th March 2020

In these testing times, I have already been immensely impressed by the determination shown by a number of Freemasons to maintain their daily advancement in Masonic knowledge, and how receptive everyone has been to the challenges we face.

As the joint letter that I, and the CEO of the Masonic Charitable Foundation, the Freemasons’ Charity, has said, there is so much that we ought to do to demonstrate the value of who we are and what we do as Freemasons in the community. This also affords a great opportunity for every mason to expand his masonic horizons by taking advantage of the new Solomon website as well as honing and passing on their ritual skills.

While we will all be required to make adjustments during this period of suspension, I would also ask that members fully acquaint themselves with whether certain adjustments can co-exist with the Obligation that we all took when initiated. It is the opinion of the Grand Registrar that it is an “Antient Landmark of the Order” that Lodge meetings and the related ceremonies can only take place with all Brethren physically present in a properly tyled Lodge Room; however, it is acceptable for members to practise such ceremonies, most particularly those aspects which make up the spoken parts of the ritual, over the internet. The security implications and pitfalls (for example the ability to record on a number of software platforms) unfortunately do not square with our Obligation to assure privacy and confidentiality of proceedings – and we therefore ask members to refrain from any demonstrations of those elements of the ceremonies covered in the Obligation, or any attempt to reproduce the ‘choreography’ online. We have no doubt that our Directors of Ceremonies will have no difficulty in putting our Brethren right on such things when we are happily able to meet again. For these reasons please do not try to hold a genuine Lodge or Lodge of Instruction in a virtual form, but feel free to practise those elements outlined above.

We will, in the days and weeks to come, be providing LOIs with material from Solomon, and our extensive archives to enable learning, discussion and that ever important Daily Advancement in Masonic Knowledge.

As previously stated, I have no doubt that Brethren will continue to adapt to this challenging situation – but simply ask that thought is given to the implications that these have on our ancient Craft.

Dr David Staples FRCP
Grand Secretary

An update from John Pagella,
Grand Superintendent of Works
Friday 20th March 2020

The suspension of Masonic Activity will undoubtedly have an affect upon our Masonic Centres and will give rise to a number of concerns.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer in his recent budget announced a raft of measures designed to protect the national economy, and over recent days the Prime Minister has made a series of further announcements outlining aid and assistance available to qualifying businesses and those affected by the Coronavirus Emergency including the availability of reliefs and financial support across a whole range of scenarios.

The measures to support organisations and businesses through the Coronavirus pandemic are many and varied, and in the first instance Masonic Centres should approach their local authority to seek guidance on business rate relief measures and grants that may be available.

The gov.uk website has very helpful guidance on grants, loan guarantees, business interruption loan schemes, tax difficulties, business rate holidays and possible relief from utility bills to ease financial burdens.

Similarly, those Masonic Centres which employ staff can obtain useful guidance, from the same source, in regard to financial support and entitlement to Statutory Sick pay.

The current situation is extremely fluid, and close attention should be given to public announcements and updates on the Government and Local Authority information services.

In some cases Professional Advice may need to be sought to ensure the most appropriate assistance is received.

As GSuptWks I would welcome feedback where relief and assistance has been obtained or otherwise so this can be co-ordinated to assist others where appropriate.

John Pagella,
Grand Superintendent of Works

As this is a fast changing situation we will update this story as developments occur
Categories
Charity MCF News

Community Action: Exeter Deaf Academy.

Exeter Royal Academy for Deaf Education has been located in the City for over 190 years. It is a bi-lingual day and residential school which welcomes deaf children and young people, aged between 5 and 25 from across the UK.

Its aim is to give students the confidence, communication skills, education, and support network they need to achieve their goals.

The success of the academy has meant that it’s current facilities no longer meet the needs of its Students and Staff. It has therefore been decided to move to a new purpose built Campus in Exmouth. The new buildings will include a range of up to date facilities to cater for a diverse range of needs including autism, epilepsy, physical and multi-sensory disabilities.

It is hoped that construction of the new buildings will be completed later this year.

The work of the Academy first came to the attention of Devonshire Freemasons when their Leader, Provincial Grand Master Ian Kingsbury, heard a presentation at The House of Lords by Steve Morton, Director of Development for the academy.

Inspired by what he had heard, Ian returned to Devonshire determined to help those affected by this very
difficult sensory disability.

To this end, he approached the Devonshire Freemasons Benevolent Fund Committee who agreed an immediate donation of £5,000.

MCF Logo
Masonic Charitable Foundation

Following this initial donation in October 2018, an approach was made to the Freemasons’ central charity the Masonic Charitable Foundation (MCF) who have agreed further funding of £28,380 to equip a Multi-Sensory Immersive Space within the new centre in Exmouth, bringing the total donated to £33,380.

Recently Devonshire Freemasons’ Chief Fundraiser, Reuben Ayres, accompanied by Clive Eden, visited the Academy. Here they met up again with Steve Morton and Appeals Manager Sarah Shaw and presented them with a certificate confirming the £28,380 which is going to support the wonderful work undertaken by the Academy.

When presenting the certificate, Reuben Ayres said:

‘Young people all need us to be there to help them grow for the future, none more so than those with a lack of hearing who are denied the normal things that we take so much for granted in the world we live in.’

Reuben Ayres, Provincial Charity Steward, Province of Devonshire

Explaining how the donation would assist in the Academy’s work, Steve Morton said:

‘We are extremely grateful for the ongoing support from the Provincial Grand Lodge of Devonshire and now the Masonic Charitable Foundation. Without the support of generous organisations like these we wouldn’t be able to change the lives of some of the most vulnerable Deaf young people in UK.

Our work helps young people, who have often been isolated in the past, to access education and opportunities for development which ultimately will enable them to have more independent lives.

The immersive room is there to help those facing the greatest challenges to benefit from our work and Ian, Reuben and their fellow Freemasons have played a large part in making that a reality.’

Steve Morton, Director of Development.

To find out more about the exiting new development at Exeter Royal Academy for Deaf Education

Click Here

Categories
About History

Freemasonry through the Ages.

When, where, how, why Freemasonry originated are questions which are still the subject of intense speculation. The consensus amongst most Masonic scholars is that it descends directly or indirectly from the organisation of operative stonemasons who built the great cathedrals and castles of the middle ages.

Here we bring you a brief round up of the most important historic milestones.

July 31, 1599

The Oldest Masonic Lodge Minutes in existence are from the Lodge of Edinburgh No. 1 which has records to prove its continual existence as the world’s oldest Masonic Lodge.

1646
Elias Ashmole
Elias Ashmole

Elias Ashmole (The founder of the Ashmolean Museum at the University of Oxford) recorded his initiation into Freemasonry with these words…

“October 16, 4.30pm – I was made a freemason at Warrington in Lancashire with Colonel Henry Mainwaring (a Roundhead parliamentarian friend related to his father-in-law) of Karincham in Cheshire. The names of those that were then at the Lodge, Mr Richard Penket Worden, Mr James Collier, Mr Richard Sankey, Henry Littler, John Ellam, Richard Ellam and Hugh Brewer.”

Diary of Elias Ashmole

This is the first evidence of the initiation of an English speculative mason – notwithstanding the fact that those present and listed would have certainly been initiated at an earlier date.

24 June 1717
Goose and Gridiron
Plaque near the site of the Goose and Gridiron

Four London Lodges, which had existed for some time, came together at the Goose and Gridiron Tavern in St Paul’s Churchyard in London, declared themselves a Grand Lodge and elected Anthony Sayer as their Grand Master. This was
the first Grand Lodge in the world.

1723

By this time the new Grand Lodge had published its first rule book – The Book of Constitutions of Masonry – and was meeting quarterly and recording its meetings. It had extended its authority outside London.

1725

The Grand Lodge of Ireland was established.

1736

The Grand Lodge of Scotland was established. The three Home Grand Lodges began to take Freemasonry overseas and the development of Freemasonry abroad mirrors the 18th and 19th century development of the British Empire.

1751

A rival Grand Lodge appeared in London. Its original members were Irish Masons who claimed that the original Grand Lodge had made innovations. They dubbed the first Grand Lodge the Moderns and called themselves the Antients. The two existed side by side – both at home and abroad – for nearly 63 years, neither recognising each other as regular.

1813

After four years of negotiation, the two Grand Lodges in England united on 27 December 1813 to form the
United Grand Lodge of England.
This union led to a great deal of standardisation of ritual, procedures and regalia.

1814

Some 647 Lodges were in existence. The 19th century saw a great expansion of Freemasonry – both at home and abroad.

1900

2,800 Lodges had been established despite losses when independent Grand Lodges were formed in Canada and Australia in the later part of the century.

1933
Freemasons Hall
Freemasons Hall, London

Freemasons Hall in Great Queen Street in London was opened as The Masonic Peace Memorial

1914 -1945

The two World Wars both had a great effect on English Freemasonry.

In the three years after the First World War over 350 new Lodges were set up, and in the three years after the Second World War nearly 600 new Lodges came into being.

In many cases the founders were servicemen who wanted to continue the camaraderie they had built up during their war service, and were looking for a calm centre in a
greatly changed and changing world.

1967

On 14 June 1967 the 250th anniversary of Grand Lodge was celebrated at the Royal Albert Hall. Centrepiece of the celebrations was the installation as Grand Master of
HRH The Duke of Kent,
who still holds that office today.

1992

On 10 June 1992 over 12,500 Freemasons and guests gathered at Earls Court in West London to celebrate the 275th anniversary of Grand Lodge.

For the first time press and television were present at a meeting of Grand Lodge and the event featured on television newscasts around the world.

2017

Freemasons from around the world celebrated the 300th Anniversary of the United Grand Lodge of England..

Some famous Freemasons…

  • At least five Kings of England (more recently Edward VII, Edward VIII and George VI)
  • The present Duke of Kent
  • Statesmen Winston Churchill and Lord Kitchener
  • Military genius the Duke of Wellington
  • Authors Rudyard Kipling and Arthur Conan Doyle
  • World Cup winning England manager, Sir Alf Ramsey
  • The explorer Ernest Shackleton
  • The scientist who discovered penicillin, Alexander Fleming
  • Painter William Hogarth
  • 18th Century Poet Alexander Pope
  • Flamboyant playwright Oscar Wilde
  • Famous actors David Garrick, Richard Todd and Peter Sellers
  • Musicians: Arthur Sullivan of Gilbert and Sullivan fame and Nat King Cole